Training Tips

Articles by Vladimir Vasiliev

The articles presented here are for the education and enjoyment of the Systema community. The writers are solely responsible for the content and such content may not completely reflect the views of Russian Martial Art Systema by Vladimir Vasiliev. Any training conducted by you is at your sole risk.

Born in Russia, Vladimir Vasiliev received intense combative training and profound Systema training from Mikhail Ryabko. Vladimir moved to Canada, and in 1993 founded the first school of Russian Martial Art outside Russia - Systema Headquarters.

He has since personally trained and certified well over 700 qualified Russian Martial Art Systema instructors and schools in over 40 countries worldwide, and has produced an Award-Winning instructional film collection. Vladimir holds a number of government medals and awards including the Russian "Order of Duty and Honor" and the "Order of Loyalty". He offers regular training at his school in Toronto, at international seminars and camps, and through the Systema Video Program.


Systema Training Vladimir Vasiliev

Application of Breathing

by Vladimir Vasiliev Published: July 17, 2007

How to breathe to prepare yourself for a fight? When an untrained person perceives danger, his heart rate and blood pressure go up, while the breathing gets disrupted - he usually holds his breath for a short time. As a result of stress, there is tension and restriction of movement so full breathing becomes impossible. Thus, the heart is working harder, the blood flows to the muscles, while there is not enough oxygen supply. […]

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Systema Training Vladimir Vasiliev

Boxing, Sambo or Mud Fighting...

by Vladimir Vasiliev Published: July 04, 2007

This incident took place when I was 14 years of age. I grew up in Tver, a fairly tough industrial city, 2 hours North of Moscow. I lived at home only on weekends, as for all 5 weekdays, I had to stay at a boarding school full of orphans and very rough kids from seriously troubled families. Naturally, martial arts were among our key interests. Out of 13 boys in my class, 12 trained in Boxing and one did Sambo Wrestling. Of course, I was quite skeptical about that one boy and had a much higher opinion of Boxing. […]

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Systema Training Vladimir Vasiliev

Thoughts from Class

by Vladimir Vasiliev Published: October 31, 2006

THOUGHTS FROM CLASS             by Vladimir Vasiliev   A human being is a complete system and for this reason we have to make our training a complete and whole system as well (thus, the Russian word for our training approach is Systema).   Many sports and martial arts assume and presuppose that the person entering the training is healthy. In fact, this is almost never the case. The physiological parameters such as heart rate, blood pressure, lung capacity, posture, mobility and strength of the joints and muscles, condition of the nervous system are rarely ideal. […]

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Systema Training Vladimir Vasiliev

Walk Your Fists to Striking

by Vladimir Vasiliev Published: September 19, 2006

  WALK YOUR FISTS TO STRIKING by Vladimir Vasiliev Many factors prevent you from delivering strong and precise strikes. One of the main factors is the fear of hurting yourself, it maybe an unconscious fear until you become or are made aware of it. Most individuals are afraid of hurting their own hand upon striking (this explains why in many contact sports, such as boxing, people wear gloves or wrap-up their hands before fighting). […]

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Systema Training Vladimir Vasiliev

A Trap for a Hero

by Vladimir Vasiliev Published: May 26, 2006

As we know, stress leads to tension in our body. When someone approaches us, we experience displeasure from the possible intrusion of our body space or our zone of safety. We may sense danger or just general discomfort. In essence, all these feelings are really fear. Fear always leads to tension. Fear is physically perceived not in the head but in the body, usually in the area of the chest or stomach, and that is where the tension arises and spreads through the rest of the body. The problem with tension is that it interferes with all movements. […]

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